shocks alternatives

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DavidIt
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shocks alternatives

Post by DavidIt » 13 Jul 2019, 07:02

Hi,
Due shipping costs and import taxes, i'm looking for QA1 alternatives in Europe. I found this post about Protech and would like to do do the same. 1.9 in front and 2.25 in the back.
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=429&p=4815&hilit=protech#p4815

This is the link to the shock I think is comparable with QA1 (now i focus on the rear shocks):
https://www.protechshocks.co.uk/protech ... e-2-25-id/

If I take "18.5in extended (instead of 18.75)/ Bearing 1 1/2 x 12mm/Bearing 1 1/2 x 12mm, will be ok in midlana?

I read several times about the value 350lbs/in as the spring rate for the rear. For a lightweight 1.6L engine is a good decent starting point?

thanks,
David

Midlana1
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Re: shocks alternatives

Post by Midlana1 » 13 Jul 2019, 08:48

In short, yes to both your questions.

Long answer, in case anyone's considering looking at production car shocks to keep costs down —

There are three requirements for shocks:
1. Mechanical size:
As long as the shocks are the right length, you'll be fine. Shock length sets suspension travel, as well as providing the physical stop for how far the suspension can extend.

2. Valving:
There are two aspects that affect shock valving, the first being that Midlana is much lighter than most production cars, which means less damping is required. Secondly, production cars typically place shocks in less-than-optimum positions, it increases the required damping, which is in the wrong direction for our application.

3. Ability to use springs mounted over the shock body:
This rules out nearly all production car shocks. I personally feel that trying to convert/adapt regular shocks to coil over units will be a failure. Adapting spring perches isn't the problem, it's that the shock valving was probably wrong to start with.

Now, all that said, because you live in Europe, you have a much larger selection of really small and light car shocks to chose from. "If" you can find them the right length and diameter, and "if" you can get them off a light enough car, something where the forces seen on the shock will be similar to Midlana, you may have a shot at ending up with something very inexpensive. Regardless, it'll likely still require adapting them to have spring perches.

Lastly, understand that shock damping is very much a personal preference. Some people like a smooth ride (for a road-going cruiser, for example). At the other end of the spectrum are people building track-only cars, where really stiff shocks are what it take to attain the fastest lap time.

So there's my long and involved non-answer... "it depends!"

ChrisS
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Re: shocks alternatives

Post by ChrisS » 14 Jul 2019, 00:16

I went with single adjustable Protechs on my build. I had to fit spacers to reduce travel though, but that’s an easy modification. I went with 1.9” at both ends. Glad I did as 2.25 at the back would have been tight with my choice of engine.

I opted for 1/2” bearings though, just to keep things as standard throughout as possible. Nothing wrong with using 12mm.
Midlana No.2

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Re: shocks alternatives

Post by DavidIt » 14 Jul 2019, 23:56

good morning)
thanks for short and long answers and to Chris. my knoledge of this topics are very very limited, if Chris went for single.. i think i can do the same in my road-not powerful engine build.
thanks again!
David

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Re: shocks alternatives

Post by ChrisS » 15 Jul 2019, 13:25

I've always been too tight to spend on double adjustable, but wouldn't argue against them being a better device. I doubt I'd have the experience to make much sense of adjusting them though!

I fitted Protect dampers (single adjustable again) to the Westfield a few years back - they are working well enough for us on a road car and are a pretty popular choice. Nitron are another option for us in the UK but again, pretty spendy compared to the Protech.
Midlana No.2

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