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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 09 Jan 2018, 13:12
by ChrisS
I never really finished messing with those aspects of my last car. Nearly every time I drove it, I had the laptop plugged in logging and would have a look at what it had grabbed when I got where I was going. I’d fitted a map switch so could select from a choice of 3 on the fly. My usual trick was to have a “last known good” map in slot 3, then mess alternately with 1 & 2. That way, when (not if) I messed it up so it would stall of whatever, I could instantly get back to sanity.

I also spent quite long time running it in self-adaptive mode, with a target AFR map that I would fine-tune then let the ECU tweak the fuel to hit the goal. This could be a slow process as you had to be on a given cell for a bit before it would regard it as stable and consider adjusting. What that process did reveal was which map cells you hardly ever reached and those that you spent most time on in normal road driving. Actually quite helpful.

Given an OEM will spend thousands of hours driving under all possible conditions, it shouldn’t really be a surprise that a couple of hours on the rollers isn’t perfect should it, yet you often see complaints.

I totally agree about the poor idle or starting or flat spots. No excuse not to sort it, it just takes time and effort. If you can’t lean in, turn the key and have it start quick and clean, hot or cold, without having to nurse the throttle, it ain’t finished.

Honestly, I am secretly glad I’m sticking with the OEM management in mine this time round.

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 10 Jan 2018, 10:05
by Midlana1
So as things get solved (intercooler ducting, ECU retune, drivability, etc.), issues previously less-important have bubbled to the top of the list.

After installing Engine V2.0, an oil leak was found under the engine, unfortunately traced to one edge of the front cover. I say "unfortunately" because on a Honda K-series engine, the front cover is trapped by the oil pan and cylinder head. Even if I got it out without destroying the head or pan gasket, there's no way I'd ever get it back in. Neither gasket in those areas are critical but it would most certainly introduce new oil leaks.

What's interesting is how the dripping only happens with the engine is not running. Due to running a dry sump oil system, a side perk of it is that it pulls a vacuum in the crankcase which prevents any oil from leaving! The puzzling thing is that just sitting there it drips a fair amount of oil. Over the last six months or so, it's filled the drip pan on the floor about half way. With the leak along one edge of the front cover, it's fairly high up on the engine, so where the heck is all the oil coming from? I'd expect that as soon as the engine's shut down, the hot oil in the head and front cover would quickly find its way back to the pan, and yet, there it is on the floor.

So the challenge is how to fix it in-place and what *might* work is to take advantage of the dry sump's vacuum. That is, apply gasket sealer along the suspect area, then drive for an hour or so. The idea is that the vacuum will draw the sealer into the leak, and the heat will cure it relatively fast. The trick is finding a low viscosity gasket sealer that gets drawn easily into cracks, which seems unlikely, so I'll probably be stuck with whatever's available. That said, if it's too low a viscosity, it'll get entirely sucked in and not seal anything; water-thin is too far in the other direction. I guess the first thing is to double-check that the leak's coming from where I think it is.

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 10 Jan 2018, 21:44
by rennkafer
How long does it sit before you see leaks? If I were to guess, I'd say your dry sump tank is draining back into the engine through the pump and filling it more than it ought to be. Front cover probably was never intended to hold anything more than splash.

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 11 Jan 2018, 06:22
by Midlana1
Yes, the oil level in the tank does drop, but less than an inch over a week. The thing is, the trail of oil gets within just a few inches of the cylinder head, so it's way above the pan. That said, I didn't consider until just now that maybe there's more than one leak. It's possible that upper "leak" is just very slight weeping and maybe there's a more substantial leak down. Some detective work is in order.

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 11 Jan 2018, 07:16
by rennkafer
Might be time to invest in a dye kit and a UV flashlight if you haven't yet. Really helpful for this sort of detective work.

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 11 Jan 2018, 08:39
by Midlana1
Ha! I didn't even know this existed - ordered both the dye and flashlight. Thank you for the pointer!

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 13 Jan 2018, 15:46
by Midlana1
Cleaned all the oil off the engine and went for an hour drive. As suspected, there was zero oil on the outside of the engine, so that's confirmation that the dry sump vacuum keeps all the oil inboard while running. I received the dye and flashlight yesterday but will do the actual test tomorrow - it was too nice a day* to spend the afternoon working in the garage!

*Unfortunately everyone else had the same idea and the highway down the coast was pretty much bumper-to-bumper :( For those of you wanting to install a 500 hp engine, keep that in mind...

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 13 Jan 2018, 22:29
by rennkafer
Midlana1 wrote:Ha! I didn't even know this existed - ordered both the dye and flashlight. Thank you for the pointer!
And they make the dye for coolant and a/c too. Handy stuff. You're welcome!

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 15 Jan 2018, 09:44
by Midlana1
So I was ready to put the dye in the oil, but after checking the pan again, saw what may be the source of most of the leak, the turbo oil return fitting on the dry sump pan. It has a threaded port that an AN fitting and Stato Seal* screw into - it should have "just worked" but the leak says otherwise. I think the O-ring seal wasn't getting compressed enough due to how the pan is machined around the port, so gasket sealer was applied to the threads, the AN fitting reinstalled, and the clock starts over on watching for leaks. Pretty sure the leak from the front cover is still there but it was all wiped down and it'll be watched as well. If it starts weeping again, either the dye will be used or some sealant applied to the "afflicted area".

*Stato Seal:
Image

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Posted: 15 Jan 2018, 13:51
by Midlana1
I rarely open the garage door in order to minimize "drive-bys", unscheduled drop-ins from strangers who spotted the car, but it happened again yesterday. Young guy, cigarette, hmm, okay. He asked "how fast does it go?" and a little part of me died inside. Before I could pigeonhole him as "an obvious V8 guy", he said "If I had one of these I'd put a 427 big block in it", and another part of me died.

Okay, I get it, we aren't all the same and I know that not everyone wants a little car with a 4-cylinder. Most people just understand cubic inches, and while I tried explaining power-to-weight, I think it just got lost.

This reminds me of the 707 hp Dodge Charger Hellcat everyone's impressed by... the 4600 lb Hellcat (with driver), which translates to a Midlana running 277 hp... think about that. I didn't try explaining, figuring that, too, would get lost. The guy seemed fine and well-intentioned, and just curious, but you just never know.