Kurt Bilinski's build

Follow progress of your fellow builders. Pictures encouraged!
Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 09 Nov 2009, 11:11

It's a little late but I thought I'd start a build blog. The Midlana website has most of the pictures and text, but often there's other stuff to discuss, of more interest for serious builders than occasional visitors.

This week, wiring starts. All the drawings are done - which saves time and should result in minimum sparks! One goal is to have the dash removable with one or two connectors. Today's lunch-time task is to create a spreadsheet of said connector and list all the signals, along with corresponding pin numbers on all the affected drawings.

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 10 Nov 2009, 11:46

Bought battery cables. Learned that the local NAPA, while they're convenient, is certainly no bargain. Turns out http://www.beiterbattery.com has it a lot cheaper (~30% less.)

Finished the connector spreadsheet. Ended up using 43 of the 55 pins on the connector. Most went to the lights.

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 11 Nov 2009, 17:21

I've had a full-size Odyssey battery kicking around the garage for more than 10 years. In fact, some of the early Kimini pictures show it being used as ballast, and also for cranking the engine for the first time.

Well, history repeats itself. It's on the charger now and I wonder how, after sitting for 10 years on the shelf, if it'll hold a charge. Eh, worth a try, and it'll only be used for initial start-up and won't be installed in the car.

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 16 Nov 2009, 10:50

Wasted nearly an hour trying to figure out how to get the tiny pins out of the ECU connectors. That had to be done because while the connector housing fits the ECU, the wires are different colors and go to different pins (the cost of mixing and matching drivetrain parts.) One thing that comes with age is learning to back away when things aren't going well. Turns out that, with enough digging, the AMP connector data sheet on these connectors is on-line, and they show how to remove the pins. Sure enough, after modifying a tiny screwdriver, it takes about 3-seconds to get a pin out.

The electrical system is actually moving along better than expected. As was mentioned on the Midlana site is that the hard stuff's already done. Yet another consequence of mixing and matching, there's a couple ground and power lines in the engine harness that are unaccounted for. They should be dealt with this weekend.

Looking forward to starting it, the remote oil setup will probably be shelved for the moment. No point in filling the filters and lines with oil, then having to remove the drippy mess when it's all disassembled. For now a plain Honda filter will be used, if I can find the threaded filter fitting... If not, the dual setup will be used and I'll just deal with the mess.

Speaking to starting it, there's a decision to be made. Do I drive the car (down the street and back) before disassembling it for paint? It can be tough to get at all the suspension brackets to fully weld them, and as one Locost builder found, it's not wise driving on public streets with tack-welded brackets! If they're welded, it means removing everything from the car and fully-welding everything, some of which require turning the chassis over. Or, do I push on, get it completely done - but unpainted - then disassemble it once, and send everything out? Not sure.

User avatar
Karlo
Posts: 26
Joined: 23 Aug 2009, 10:56
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Loss Wages
Contact:

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Karlo » 16 Nov 2009, 12:01

Midlana1 wrote:Do I drive the car (down the street and back) before disassembling it for paint? It can be tough to get at all the suspension brackets to fully weld them, and as one Locost builder found, it's not wise driving on public streets with tack-welded brackets! If they're welded, it means removing everything from the car and fully-welding everything, some of which require turning the chassis over. Or, do I push on, get it completely done - but unpainted - then disassemble it once, and send everything out? Not sure.


As you have written, driving before secured will lead to more work in the long run. My suggestion would run the car on your table / stand, kinda like a GoKart. Run it long enough to verify your alignments on the back.
www.KitSpeed.com

Langan
Posts: 379
Joined: 21 Dec 2008, 09:52

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Langan » 16 Nov 2009, 21:42

I think you should try before paint. Turn it over with motor in it or weld inside of brackets. I have seen your welds in the pictures and they look a lot better than the tacks on the Locost that broke. I think we will want to know yours works as soon as posible. Be sides you most likley will want to build body with out paint on frame.
Only draw back is once it run very hard to dissasemble

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 17 Nov 2009, 06:36

Karlo's bug and cursor are messing with my head...

Anyhow - no, there's no concern about me not disassembling it for paint. Since I'd drive it (uninsured, uninspected) it's not like I'm going very far; a five-minute drive tops. I'm fully aware of the hazards of driving the car "for real" before it's done. My brother's a good example of that; his Stalker still has unpainted fenders and hood - it looks like an unfinished garage project.

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 17 Nov 2009, 09:48

Been thinking about a catch can. This is a container that collects oil vapor fumes from the engine.

In the case of turbo engines, having a catch can is even more important. A turbo pushes much more air in, but most importantly, unlike a normally-aspirated engine, air going into the cylinders is under positive pressure, not being sucked in by vacuum. For this reason, there is a lot more blow-by getting past the pistons, accumulating in the crankcase, and needing a way out.

The PCV valve handles it, passing the fumes and oil mist back into the intake manifold, to be burned "next time through." In the case of a turbo, though, it has to be fed in upstream of the turbo (to have vacuum) and having oil mist go through the turbo causes problems.

Typically a catch can has two hoses running to it, one from the valve cover and one from the block/PCV. Stainless steel wool (scrubbing pads) inside the tank condense the oil out, and the blow-by gases exit out the top through a small air filter. The oil that collects in the bottom is either drained through a hose back to the oil pan, or the tank is periodically drained. The catch can prevents pressure from causing oil leaks, or pushing out oil seals.

I wouldn't mind buying a used one (an efficiency of time thing) but at $150-$250, it seems sort of rediculous for what it is. The trick is to finding an appropriate container in a camping store or a kitchen department, then weld on a couple fittings.

Midlana1
Site Admin
Posts: 2760
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 16:44
Anti-spam question: 4
Are you a spammer: No
Location: Southern California

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 17 Nov 2009, 12:39

Seeing some unhappy comments about the DriveShaft Shop, maker of custom axles, and who's product I'm using. http://www.k20a.org/forum/showthread.php?t=48196

The complaints are that the axles make a clicking sound, and is supposed to have been caused by some heat-treat issue(?) that's since been within the last year or so, yet some people say their new axles do the same thing.

I bring this up because Midlana requires custom axles. There aren't many companies out there that do that; http://www.driveshaftshop.com/ and http://www.gatorracingaxles.com/.

Anyhow, I recieved my axles a while back and when they were checked out, and there's clearly some free-play on the CV assemblies. Hmmm. Wonder if I should contact them. They're expensive assemblies and it would suck of they aren't right, so I wrote them a letter and we'll see where it leads, for better or for worse.

Langan
Posts: 379
Joined: 21 Dec 2008, 09:52

Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Langan » 17 Nov 2009, 17:01

Yes please find out before I buy mine. It's nice to have a test buyer....Jim


Return to “Builder's diaries”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests