Kurt Bilinski's build

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Midlana1
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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Post by Midlana1 » 12 Aug 2019, 14:27

Finally got around to riveting in the radiator ducting, which force all the air through the radiator instead of sneaking around it. Can't say I saw much of a coolant temperature change, but thinking about it, I don't think it will. That is, if at a given time, the radiator is using 85% of its cooling capacity to maintain temperature at 90C, and if the radiator's cooling capacity is increased by, oh, say 10%, I'm not sure it would show up. In other words, go back out after adding it and now the radiator is using 85% - 10% of its cooling capacity, or 75%. Either way, coolant temperature would likely remain the same. The only time ducting would improve things would be at the limit, at near top speed, lugging it up a mountain, or maybe stuck in stop-and-go traffic. Regardless, it seemed wise to take care of it now.

In other news, I don't feel very motivated to fabricate a new engine cover, but I'll have to force myself anyway; it's rather important in case of an engine fire. I'm also curious to see if coolant temperature increases after adding it, since there's less area for the heat to escape. Than again, it's unclear whether there's lower pressure above the engine, or behind it. The previous cover was made from 0.05" aluminum, which was easy to work with. If I really expect it to stop flames though, it should probably be stainless, it's a requirement on aircraft. The trouble with that stuff is if it's thin enough to deal with, it's then too floppy to support itself without a framework of some sort, which is more work. In the case of aircraft though, in case of an engine fire, it needs to stay contains just as long as possible in order to land. In the case of a car, I'd think far less time is required to bring it to a stop. I'll have to think about it.

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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Post by Midlana1 » 12 Aug 2019, 14:47

I've started thinking about the upcoming hill climb and how best to record it. Since there's a number of practice runs, it probably makes the most sense from a production standpoint to record multiple points, a different one each run. In editing, the main run would make up 60-70% of it, with bits of alternate angles thrown in for interest. I'd also like to—at least once—sit the camcorder out on the road and run it over (straddling it of course). That means having someone part way up the hill sit the camera out there, and to quickly retrieve it. That assumes they know when I'm getting close, which may be hard to coordinate. It also has to be placed where the car won't have its suspension compressed, because otherwise, it could be a rather dizzy scene from that moment until the camera stops tumbling, assuming that I could even get the video out of the wrecked camera.

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