Alfa powered build.

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Midlana1
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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby Midlana1 » 30 Oct 2018, 18:42

Hmm, unrest in the camp; I'll have to review how mine is on the car.

ChrisS
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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 31 Oct 2018, 01:19

I’m happy with how it is, no dissent here ;) Shortening the rack isn’t a trivial thing to do though, using a stock rack is preferable to me and the authorities over here don’t like modified racks.

The spacers are obvious enough in some of your build pictures Kurt, just needed me to look was all. I can’t see any issue with them though, as long as they are substantial, with crush tubes. If there are concerns about lateral strength, weld the spacers to the existing mounts and add a couple of short braces. Not necessary though I don’t think.

I’m very happy with the result. I see no reason why I won’t be able to get it as near to perfect zero bump as I’m able to measure. I’m not going to fuss with it now, there’s no point at this stage I think. Once the car is complete, I’ll set the geometry properly.

I did a very quick test of the back and saw a bit of toe-in on bump. Didn’t make any real effort to measure it at that time but might do so next time I’m in the shed. I’ve made no real effort to set up the back end though, so that needs doing first. Main thing I need to decide is where to set the top mount, as toe is an easy one to set. When I first installed the rear suspension, I found that the main lower arm only really fits nicely at one point of adjustment of both rod ends due to the angles involved. Before I actually tried it, I think I expected there would be an amount of adjustment but I hadn’t thought it through. That establishes one point more or less, the front lower corner of the upright, but the rest are pretty free so there’s lots to think about.

Time to re read some parts of the book I think.

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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 04 Nov 2018, 02:16

Nothing photo-worthy, but I've sorted the radiator move and shortened the lower steering column. As it turned out, with the extra space between rad and chassis, I was abler to fit some rubber mounts, which I am happier about than the previous rigid mounting. One chassis mount had to go as it was in the way of the bottom hose. I can't make a new one until the air horns arrive as I want to combine both jobs into one mounting. This one will be a bit funky as it'll have to pick up on the front of the rad, rather than the rear.

Also made a very simple angle bracket to take the wheel speed sensor at the back. I'm using MX5 calipers with an adapter from Freakyparts (no, not Andre this time!) that allows use of a bigger disc. It also gave me an ideal spot to attach the bracket.

....and that's about it for now.

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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 10 Nov 2018, 05:23

More non-photogenic constructive deconstruction is about all there is to report. Decided it was time to get the main rear bulkhead panel done.

SO, removed the hydraulic pipes & all the wires from the tunnel. I did make a start and had thought to make the panel in two parts, with the lower section 'boxing in' the tank and an upper section for the pipes & lines to come through....but it was looking really awkward, complicated and messy, mainly due to the handbrake forcing the main coolant pipes too far back.

OK, more steps backwards. Handbrake modified by relocating the cable idler wheel I'd fitted. This allowed the mounting plate to be a bit smaller, although the idler now takes up the place the handbrake warning light switch used to live, so that needs sorting. Handbrake cable bracket modified to accommodate the new cable path (well, junked and a new one made - much happier with the new one as it happens), some space 'relieved' for the pipes and they could then be moved 'forward' so the bends aren't as tight to the bulkhead. Just before removing the coolant pipes, I made some card templates to attach to the cross tube that will help me mark the coolant line locations on the panel when I finally make it - a difficult task otherwise. Having done that, I discovered that I have created an almost impossible puzzle in that the pipes can't be removed with their ends constrained by the place they will sit in the panel. I've tried to ease a bit more wiggle room around the handbrake support bracket/gear cable support bracket static parts but don't know it I've done enough.

My current thinking is that I will still make the panel in two parts, but now a single plane rather than the horribly complicated thing I had in mind before, with a horizontal join running along the transverse tube I have put in there. Considering the panel will have bends top & bottom, and the space it fits into widens towards the top, but there is little room to angle it into place due to the converging chassis top tubes, the central tunnel not to mention at the top where the panel has to allow for the top tubes.....a single piece looks just too darn hard.

The issue with the main coolant tubes being impossible to install/remove once the panel is in - not 100% sure about this yet. I'll make the lower panel and put it in place then see if I can persuade the tubes in. If not, I can consider either a large grommet to generate some freedom of movement or perhaps a large hole in the panel with a separate 'closing plate' that bolts on. Leaning toward the 'closing plate idea at the moment.

Had to tweak the ECU mounting brackets a wee bit as well - hadn't allowed enough space for the bulkhead panel at the top.

Right, time to go do battle with some aluminium sheets.

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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 23 Nov 2018, 13:54

Feel like I've been doing battle with this bit for a while now....but I think I've got it beat at last. Doesn't seem much to show for all the effort, but it's a tricky set of problems finally resolved, so that's good.


Bulkhead is in two main parts, with some smaller removable sections in the top half that allow fitment of the cable bundles. The gear cables go through some large cable glands that are firmly fixed to the lower panel. I've still go to trim the holes for the main coolant pipes and fit grommets, but that's it.

It is at least as much of an arse to assemble as it probably looks, but once it's all together, everything is firmly located and although it doesn't look like it, there is good working clearance for the moving parts of the handbrake mechanism with no chance of anything coming into contact with said moving parts.

rear bulkhead.jpeg


The phrase 5lbs of shit in a 1lb bag seems apt.....it gets particularly snug as the whole lot squeezes past the handbrake lever, but Ive just managed to keep it all within the profile i needed to.

pipes n wires from left.jpeg


pipes n wires from right.jpeg


pipes n wires from front.jpeg


It looks a bit more tidy once it gets forward of the handbrake and gearstick.

view towards footwell.jpeg


view of footwell.jpeg


Next step is to carefully dress the pipes & cable bundles into the tunnel and fit suitable clips to hold everything firmly in place.

I'll be glad to see the back of this bit. I've had to revisit some of the cable bundles to reduce bulk and numbers of bundles, which in the end was good, but it was a bit of a chore to have to strip back things I thought were finished with (twice). Having the engine at the back does rather aggravate the problem - there are 20 signal and control connections from the ECU loom at the back, to the front of the car alone (list available on request....), plus throttle pedal (6 wires), ECU power, main battery to starter, then a whole bunch of lighting connections (each lamp has a dedicated feed due to the donor car having bulb fail monitoring), speed sensor, etc. There aren't any redundant wires in the thing, I removed all those long ago, but there are certainly more than are strictly required to get the job done.

I could have made matters slightly better by having the battery at the back, but only slightly, and there wasn't anywhere sensible left to put the battery anyway, other than were it is now, up front.

Anyhoo, onward and upward.....next after fixing it all in place will be to cover it all up.
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Midlana1
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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby Midlana1 » 23 Nov 2018, 19:31

Well played, sir - hope you took time out for turkey!

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freakynami
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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby freakynami » 23 Nov 2018, 21:27

That finish is looking great, very OEM with all of the services you've managed to keep / include. I do appreciate how clean you're managing to keep that bundle down the centre - I can only hope when I get to mine it looks that good :)

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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 24 Nov 2018, 01:23

I visited a mate the other day, he's building a Strato's replica and a GT40 at the moment. To say I was jealous of just how few wires were going front to rear on both cars would be an understatement!

I know I don't need all the bulb monitoring nonsense, but it would be tricky to remove now I've gone down the route I have, and it would only have saved me 5 thin wires anyway. The lamp driver/monitoring box could probably drive two bulbs at once if I had paralleled them up, but its a bit risky, and if I blew that up, I'd need to either repair and upgrade it, or do a major re-wire to do away with it.

I could have done away with the wires from the cruise control switches on the column to the ECU too, but again, only 6 small wires. Whether I ever use the cruise...who knows.

A minimal set of functions to get the engine going, assuming one relocates the immobiliser nonsense to the same place as the ECU would be, from memory, 6 wires? Much tidier, and what I'd have done and I not been using the donor car loom of course.

Still, it's done now, everything works, so I just need to let time erase the pain ;) Trouble is, I do keep recalling a classic bit of humour. "How do I get to {insert goal}?", "Well, I wouldn't start from here"

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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby ChrisS » 24 Nov 2018, 01:23

Midlana1 wrote:Well played, sir - hope you took time out for turkey!


We give thanks in a different way over here :D

Midlana1
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Re: Alfa powered build.

Postby Midlana1 » 24 Nov 2018, 08:12

Doh! Good point.


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