The plan

Midlana1
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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 19 Mar 2018, 09:02

ShadowCat38 wrote:ALRIGHT! You're doing doors! I'll take and post good notes on how I'm doing mine. Just out of curiosity, what changed your mind?

Easy - they aren't really "doors".

Background:
For those who don't know, my previous car (http://www.kimini.com) used a carbon fiber shell taken off an early Mini. For simplicity I used authentic Mini metal doors (also because they were already ridiculously light). Getting them to fit, however, was a real pain because the fit-up was wrong in so many ways, with irregular gaps, both in the outright size of the door opening, but also, just setting the doors in the opening showed that some parts aligned with the outside surface of the car while others didn't.

Eventually, someone explained that he used to work in the "Rectification Department" at Austin, where burly men with wood levers and rubber mallets *made* the doors fit - they bent them. After learning that, my life became much simpler and I did just that. Of course, one door wouldn't fit its opening at all and the window frame had to be cut down by about 0.20".

With Midlana, the plan is a stainless-frame hinged assembly. The vertical surface will have a vinyl or Lexan window and the rest made from convertible top material. It'll hinge at the front edge such that when pushed fully open, may actually end up resting on the front windscreen. As far as weather stripping, zippers, snaps, and latches go, I have no idea. I think trying to get the car truly watertight may be impossible because it was never set up that way, but we'll see.

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The plan

Postby Midlana1 » 19 Mar 2018, 09:23

My half-baked thinking right now is a stainless-frame hinged assembly. A portion of the vertical surface will have a vinyl window with a zipper and the rest made from convertible top material. The entire assembly will hinge up at the front edge such that when pushed fully open, may actually end up swinging around and resting on the front windscreen. Not sure that's achievable because it means having the hinge move through ~270 degrees, but we'll see how it works out. As far as weather stripping, zippers, snaps, and latches go, I have no idea yet. I think trying to get the car truly watertight may be impossible since it wasn't designed that way from the start, but we'll see how it pans out.

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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby rennkafer » 19 Mar 2018, 13:43

So for hinging, you're thinking something like this?:
2010.jpg


Or maybe more like this?:
caterhamopi.jpg
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Bill J

Midlana1
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Re: Kurt Bilinski's build

Postby Midlana1 » 19 Mar 2018, 14:32

Very much like the lower picture, though mine by necessity extend somewhat into the roof which makes getting in and out a lot easier. I'm hoping that they'll flop far enough forward to stay open while clamoring in and out. The 45 degree angle of the roll cage down tubes on the sides of the windscreen make a natural mounting point. I also want the doors to be easily removable, by lifting them off the hinge pins or something similar.

The big trick will be finding appropriate weather stripping, meaning fairly large OD (probably bulb-type) and soft. Like I said, I don't hold out much hope for making them truly waterproof because the water's likely to pool between the weather stripping and the roll cage, just waiting for the hapless occupant to crack the door open, and "splash." The doors are more for wind and sound control.

Hmm, regarding being watertight, I had doors in the back of my mind when I made the overhead intercooler intake ducting, so it does provide a smooth flange which might actually have a chance of sealing. Guess I'll find out.

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Re: The plan

Postby ChrisS » 20 Mar 2018, 00:56

The “doors”, hereafter called sidescreens :D on our Westfield are surprisingly good at keeping the weather out. The front edge is just an extra bit of vinyl that extends forwards beyond the hinge line and somewhat closes the gap between the windscreen frame and the sidescreen, the top edge sits in a groove made by the bulk of the roof material and a small lip stitched on top. You have to manually persuade the sidescreen into the groove. It’s held shut with a simple strap the pulls the bottom onto the bodywork. On the first version we had many years back, I fitted a loose flap of vinyl to act as a barrier to water that tended to blow up and under the bottom edge of the sidescreen. Airflow tended to press it against the body, providing a good seal.

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Re: The plan

Postby John Hancock » 27 Mar 2018, 10:56

Steele Rubber Products has a catalog of universal seals. Send for a catalog and they have cross sections.

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Re: The plan

Postby Midlana1 » 27 Mar 2018, 11:05

Requested - thank you!

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Re: The plan

Postby ShadowCat38 » 28 Mar 2018, 10:40

After working for a cab manufacturer, and now working with multiple cab designs for highway-ready machines, i've discovered that sealing windows and doors is not nearly as difficult as it seems like it should be. There are a LOT of forgiving shapes and profiles for window seals. The biggest problem I've noticed so far is having the door seal too well, and the contained pressure within the cab prevents the door from latching completely, even with a good, hard slam.

I'm sure you'll do fine.

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Re: The plan

Postby Midlana1 » 28 Mar 2018, 12:56

The trick is mocking up the door with the weather stripping compressed as it would be in the latched position. Being a three dimensional object makes it interesting


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