Overthinking the Build Table

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DennisDoesEverything
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Overthinking the Build Table

Post by DennisDoesEverything » 04 Feb 2019, 12:21

My in-laws junked an above-ground pool, and I snagged the metal supports that previously held the sides of the pool up. It's 14 steel posts with rubber feet, each about 3' high. I had the idea that I could use them to hold up the build table. With, say, three columns by four rows of legs, no part of the build table would be more than 2.5 feet away from a support.

The problem comes in how to actually attach them. I have 14 angled "T" connectors that go on top of the posts with side pieces to form a giant septadecagon. Unfortunately when I tried assembling partial strings of it (either curves or meandering) it is too floppy to support itself let alone other things. Also, the angles and multiples of lateral spacing give me too few auspicious combinations, as well as the added height of the T connectors making the top top high.

I could weld the horizontal pieces to the legs, but the metal is very thin, enameled, and the tubes are oval shaped. I'm not jazzed about the task of notching tubing for the car, so I certainly am not in the mood to try to cut fish mouths for tubes to fit the build table! Also I keep vacillating between thinking the whole thing must be triangulated vs wondering how little I can get away with.

Perhaps the simplest option is to use the T-tops, which already fit the legs, and just bolt or screw the T tops to the underside of the table. I would need to cut 6"-8" off all the legs to shorten them and bring the table back to the best height, but my bandsaw would make short work of that. The thing is, even the fit between the legs and the T tops is a bit wobbly. This brings me to my central question:

Is the ensemble of a dozen wobbly legs still wobbly?

In the midst of these ruminations I found the picture of Kurt's table that was suspended between two yellow saw horses (which I happen to own the same ones). Now I *know* I'm overthinking this. But I think I read that those eventually got replaced for real legs?

I'm thinking with shorter spans (2.5 ft) I don't need to make the table as thick. I bought about 20 2"x3"x8' studs for a project a couple years ago that I ended up not using. It would be nice to be able to use them up, for the core of the table. I'm worried about straightness (or lack thereof) but maybe between combing a lot of shorter pieces, and the fact they've been stored in the place they will be used, maybe it won't an issue. I have MDF for the table top.

DennisDoesEverything
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Re: Overthinking the Build Table

Post by DennisDoesEverything » 11 Feb 2019, 18:48

OK so I figured out my "build table". A restoration shop was having a going out of business sale. I picked up this scratch-built rotisserie from them.
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roy928tt
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Re: Overthinking the Build Table

Post by roy928tt » 24 Feb 2019, 23:53

I didn't go ahead and build a Midlana, Freakynami took over the set of components I'd gathered.

I got a friend of mine to construct my build table ( I just wasn't confident of getting it flat and square..) You want, nay, NEED a build table !

It is the best and simplest way of getting a datum base to build from. I've built 3 racecars from my table and I can't imagine trying to scratch build a vehicle without one.

Everything you do depends on the quality of the datum base you start from, make it easy for yourself and start with a good base.

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