DIY Dry Sump

Issues, solutions, helpful hints, shortcuts, tools, etc
Midlana1
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Re: DIY Dry Sump

Post by Midlana1 » 17 Nov 2014, 09:36

There's several ways to manage crankcase vacuum.
1. Scavenge pump size (rotor width)
2. Number of scavenge pumps
3. Pump type
3. Pump speed
4. Adjustable bleed to allow air into the crankcase.

I work with a guy who built 1000-1200 hp Honda engines; he said there's no such thing as too much crankcase vacuum. That may be, but his were drag race engines and he's probably leaving out a few details like, they probably rebuilt the engine after every meet (he was part of a fully sponsered pro team so it wasn't his money).

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Re: DIY Dry Sump

Post by Midlana1 » 17 Nov 2014, 11:01

This weekend's findings. The Dailey dry sump system absolutely won't fit unless the water pump housing is removed and an electric pump used. Not sure why they did it that way, as with a very slight change they could have made it work with either engine configuration, but oh well.

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Re: DIY Dry Sump

Post by Midlana1 » 19 Nov 2014, 19:58

If you decide someday to go with a dry sump, a couple of pointers found during my research:

Quite a few dry sump system "companies" just kit parts from elsewhere and send it out under their own label.

For some reason - at least with Honda setups - the dry sump systems are more expensive than other setups.

Buying a dry sump system from a single vendor seems like a good way to save money - or that's been the case with most anything else I've bought - not so with dry sump setups.

Dry sumps are widely used in circle track racing. The advantage for us is that we can benefit from the volume manufacturing and know that they're probably pretty decent quality, or they wouldn't last long.

Combining the above, consider the common (circle track) Peterson 8-quart dry sump tank: If you buy it from a circle track or volume performance parts vendor, it'll run $400-$460. But buy that exact same tank as part of a dry sump kit and now it's $540.

The ATI crank damper pulley, needed so that the dry sump mandrel and pulley can mount to it. Buy it from a volume retailer and it' $360... but as part of an all-in-one dry sump kit, it's $527 for the exact same part.

Here's another: You buy a kit for your exact engine so that you can get on with things, paying $118 for the magic bracket that mounts the dry sump pump to your engine block so you don't have to mess with figuring it out yourself. Only, when you go to install it, you find that the bracket is actually a "universal mount" - in that it attaches to all of the vendor's pumps, but the rest of it is blank - you have to measure and drill holes to mount it to your block. $118 and you have to measure and drill the holes... or you could buy a $10 aluminum plate, drill a couple more holes for the pump, and have the same thing.

It simply goes to show that when there's people who don't have the time nor patience to piece together a system of their own, vendors have a solution and all it takes is your credit card. It pays to do the research up front. Given the above it's best to piece one together.

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